Blood, Corpses, and HELL.

I have another creative mind to share with you today. In the spirit of showing love to indie authors, and in support of our upcoming The Day the Sun Stopped Shining Blog Tour, I present the following interview with Georgina Kamsika, author of The Sulphur Diaries (UK).

Without further ado…

1. Since your story involves blood and hell, how would you feel if a reader said they found it too scary or too gory to read? Would you be flattered, pleased, insulted, upset, etc.? Why?

Georgina: One of my earliest memories is of watching an old Dracula film. I loved it, I loved being scared and enjoyed watching and reading scarier things as I grew older. However I know a lot of people don’t really go for horror or being scared, so if it’s too scary for some people, I can live with that. I think knowing that my writing has affected someone, be it good or bad, is enough.

Dicey: Know what you mean about that old Dracula film. The older ones were pretty scary. There are dozens of them now. Apparently, lots of people love to be scared out of their minds.

Mine was–can you believe it–Fright Night (1985). When I was young and it was four o’clock in the morning, and it was dark and I was alone. *shudders* But I was fascinated. Now, I’m pleased when someone mentions my vampire novel is too gory.

2. Did you model Detective Inspector after anyone in particular? If so, who and why? If not, how did you prepare for this character?

Georgina: I try not to model my characters after any one person, mainly because I like to steal bits and pieces I overhear and turn them into a person. Visually I imagined DI Mehta to be very pretty, like the Bollywood actress Aishwarya Rai, but with a stern and serious personality, partly because she is a woman of colour in a very male-dominated profession. Preparation-wise, I did some research into the social services in the UK, and how the police interact with them. It was interesting to learn more about how our detectives work, it’s not all CSI Miami here.

Dicey: Ah. I enjoy literature that feature women of color in something other than stereotypical urban fiction.

3. Your story involves a village that is over a gateway to hell. How would you describe your vision of hell in detail?

Georgina: I’m actually writing about Hell now, in my sequel ‘Pandemonium’. While the first novel, set in England, is all about British myths and legends, my vision of Hell has allowed me to draw from wider sources. I spent some time researching Hell, or limbo, across many religions and cultures. There’s some surprising similarities and quite a few differences, so it’s been fun trying to mesh them together into a consistent place. It’s not a nice place, that’s for sure, but it’s also not the prevalent Christian idea of damned souls burning in flames.

Thanks for the chance to answer these questions. I liked them, they made me think about why I’d done those things.

Dicey: Pandemonium is a cool title. With your vision of hell as “not a nice place” but “not the prevalent Christian idea of damned souls burning in flames”, you’ve piqued my interest. I always find theories and speculations on hell intriguing, especially because of my own religious background. I work out my imaginations in fiction as well.

And, thank YOU, Georgina. It’s been a pleasure.

See you on the tour.